Pau …

I appreciate all the kind words related to the historical summaries I have prepared over the past 8 ½ years. They are now coming to an end … I assure you that I will miss them more than you. I am working on some critical things in real work and it is clear to me that I need to focus on the projects I am working on. With all of that, I need to focus on those things and cannot get distracted by a daily historical summary about Hawaii’s past.

In the meantime, all of the posts are available on the www.ImagesOfOldHawaii.com website, and will be for the foreseeable future. In addition, I am hopeful to get an interactive map (like Google Earth) up on the www.ImagesOfOldHawaii.com website that shows the place on the earth where each of the stories happened. Each icon is a story. Thanks, again, for your support and kind words. Peter. … and a fun time was had by all.

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Missionary Period

Over the course of a little over 40-years (1820-1863 – the “Missionary Period”), about 184-men and women in twelve Companies served in Hawaiʻi to carry out the mission of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM) in the Hawaiian Islands.

Collaboration between Native Hawaiians and American Protestant missionaries resulted in, among other things, the Introduction of Christianity; Development of a written Hawaiian language and establishment of schools that resulted in widespread literacy; Promulgation of the concept of constitutional government; Combination of Hawaiian with Western medicine; and Evolution of a new and distinctive musical tradition (with harmony and choral singing).

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Transformation of Waimea, South Kohala, Hawaiʻi

Still holding remnants of a cowboy town, Waimea on Hawaiʻi Island looked very different in centuries past – with transformation of forest lands, to agricultural fields, to pasture lands. Now upper pasture land, archaeologists and others suggest the upper slopes of Waimea was a forest made up of ʻōhiʻa, koa, māmane, ʻiliahi (sandalwood) and other trees. Pili grass and shrubs were also found.

Within these forested uplands, you could find a variety of forest birds, ʻiʻiwi, ʻelepaio, ʻapapane and others. This is what the earliest settlers to the region probably saw (however, it is likely the first settlers on the island probably first lived in the valleys on the wetter windward side of the island and others later came to Waimea.) Early Hawaiians first altered the landscape by clearing the forest and plotting out agricultural fields; later, introduced species took over.

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These posts are part of a personal learning experience; I have been searching to learn more about the place I and my family were born, raised, and live (and love) – then, share what I have learned.

Because of my Planning work across the Islands, as well as previously serving as Director of the State Department of Land and Natural Resources, State Historic Preservation Officer and Deputy Managing Director for Hawaiʻi County, I have had the opportunity to see some places and deal with some issues that many others have not had, nor will have, the same opportunity.

So, I am sharing some insights, events and places with others. These informal historic summaries are presented for personal, non-commercial and/or educational purposes. I hope you enjoy them. Thanks, Peter.

Read the Voyage of the Thaddeus

The Journey of the Thaddeus is live! Please stay tuned as we unveil never before read journal entries.